3D design and Thomas Heatherwick

During my 3DD rotation I decided to research Thomas Heatherwick’s work, initially because of the range of projects that his studio deals with. When looking at his ideas I was most impressed with the way he approaches each different project with a completely original idea. There is no sense of style within his work, no aesthetic hint that ties all of his designs together instead you can recognise a Heatherwick design by the pure originality and innovation of it. Heatherwick has said “It would be funny to limit yourself to one invention, which is a style, and repeat that. I have a sense of how life goes very, very fast, so it’s a waste to repeat yourself.” I actually find this idea very inspiring, I love the thought of creating radically different things with every project and not just sticking to the same format every time, approaching each project with enthusiasm to create something completely different from the last.

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Heatherwick studios work on large scale architectural projects usually, but have also recently re designed the Classic London Busses. This idea of Re-design was what I wanted to focus on for this project as I decided I felt much more comfortable improving a current product, than trying to come up with a completely new one. I also felt that it would be much more sensible to focus on a small scale crisis’, so this is how I started my design process, by looking out for every day crisis that effected me. These ranged from spread able butter not being very spread able at all (therefore ruining your perfectly prepared sandwich with unwelcome lumps of lurpak), to not being able to use your hands for up to half an hour after applying nail varnish and not being able to change your bed sheets without having to get inside the sheets and physically holding the duvet corners in place. In the end I decided to re-design a bath/shower mat that allows the fabric to dry at a much faster rate (I have recently moved into accommodation with 8 other students with only one shower and I am fed up of having to walk out onto a cold, soggy bath mat). Although this is clearly not the most exciting or original idea, I feel that looking at Heatherwick’s work helped me come up with a creative and innovative solution to an every day problem.Image

Fashion and Textiles Rotation

Fashion and Textiles Rotation

This is my final outcome from the Fashion and Textiles rotation. In my synopsis I decided that the world was recovering from a nuclear war, and a hundred years on the only place for human life to survive is in the jungle as this is the only place with any natural resources left. This scenario meant that I had to create an adornment that would camouflage in such a place but also be useful for carrying particular items such as a knife for protection and water for survival. So my outcome was made from a belt with crisp packets and other useless pieces of rubbish attached (these would be used as the pockets) with a mesh of leaves covering the torso also. This design did not work as I had hoped, the leaves were a very difficult material to work with and the metal mesh I used to stick them on was very uncomfortable for the model, it was also very hard for him to move around in so if I were to do this project again I would have thought more carefully about my use of materials. Looking at Aitor Throup’s for this project really inspired me to push my ideas that little bit further to come up with something a little more experimental rather than completely practical. Although Throup is considered “Britain’s most interesting young menswear designer” he is very much anti-fashion and approaches his projects in a more conceptual manner. This really is what makes me relate to Throup as I have no particular interest in the Fashion industry as it largely baffles and aggravates me, meaning that I had little enthusiasm about researching contemporary practitioners for this project. Throup has been an exception to my dislike of fashion designers because he does not limit himself to the fashion worlds six month life cycles, making his work consistently exciting and different.